Land

Exposed To Global Warming: North East India

Dec 14th, 2012 | By
Children braving the Monsoon rain in Sikkim’s Himalayan mountains. © Joydip Mitra/Lineair




Dandc.eu: India is expected to feel severe impacts of climate change. The country’s northeastern region, for instance, is highly vulnerable. Anticipated impacts include melting of glaciers, more floods and extended droughts. At the same time, the region’s natural resources are under enormous pressure due to population growth and rising prosperity. Germany’s KfW Development Bank has

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Reviewing Partners Role In Sustainable Mountain Development

Dec 12th, 2012 | By
MP Taskforce meet




MP: The Mountain Partnership is a United Nations voluntary alliance of partners dedicated to improving the lives of mountain people and protecting mountain environments around the world.  The Task Force meeting took place in the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs during 29-31 October 2012 of Mountain Partnership that is coordinated UN’s FAO based in Rome,

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Doha Climate Conference Closes on ‘Weak Deal’

Dec 11th, 2012 | By
Activists march to demand action on climate change during the UN's 18th climate change conference in Doha, Qatar. photograph: mohammed dabbous/reuters




Irishtimes: Doha climate conference closes on ‘weak deal’ unlikely to stem emissions. After marathon negotiations at the weekend, the UN’s 18th conference on climate change in Doha, Qatar, finally produced an agreement that would see the Kyoto Protocol continuing for a further seven years. But the deal was denounced by climate activists as inadequate to

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1990 IPCC Report Successfully Predicted Warming, New Study Shows

Dec 11th, 2012 | By
r-1990-IPCC-REPORT-large570




Huffingtonpost: Time has proven that even 22 years ago climate scientists understood the dynamics behind global warming well enough to accurately predict warming, says an analysis that compares predictions in 1990 with 20 years of temperature records. After an adjustment to account for natural fluctuations, the predictions and the observed increases matched up, the current

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Nepal: Turn On The Heat

Dec 10th, 2012 | By
Nepal Govt. Everest-Republica




My Republica: The lead up to this year’s UN Conference on Climate Change was pretty bland. The meetings got underway in Doha on November 26 without the prelude of the picturesque Cabinet meetings near the top of world. In the lead up to the annual UN Conference on Climate Change three years ago, Nepal’s government

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Greater Ambition And Action On Climate Change-Doha’s Final Text

Dec 10th, 2012 | By
CoP18Final




UNFCCC: Countries have successfully launched a new commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol, agreed a firm timetable to adopt a universal climate agreement by 2015 and agreed a path to raise necessary ambition to respond to climate change. They also endorsed the completion of new institutions and agreed ways and means to deliver scaled-up climate

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Himalayas May Experience Major Earthquakes: Study

Dec 7th, 2012 | By
himalaya-zeenews




Zee News: Scientists studying geologic features and activity in the Himalayas have warned that the mountain range, separating the plains of Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau, is primed for major earthquakes. Stanford geophysicists said that The Himalayan range was formed, and remains currently active, due to the collision of the Indian and Asian continental

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Flood Of Protest Hits Indian Dams

Dec 6th, 2012 | By
India’s hydroelectric projects, such as this dam on the River Teesta, are raising environmental concerns. DIPTENDU DUTTA/AFP/GETTY




Nature: Himalayan plans pose ecological threat, researchers warn. The days when the gigantic Indian rivers — the Ganges, Indus and Brahmaputra — roar freely down the steep slopes of the Himalayas may be numbered. Roughly 300 dams are proposed or under construction in the deeply cut valleys of India’s mountainous north, part of a massive

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Climate Change: Agriculture Takes A Backseat Again

Dec 6th, 2012 | By
Climate change activists with banners greet negotiators on their way for the second week of climate change talks at COP18 in Doha. Photo: Jaspreet Kindra/IRIN




IRIN: Discussions about much-needed support for agriculture – which is seen both as a victim and a cause of climate change – at the UN’s climate change conference in Doha have been postponed until next year. Agriculture is a contentious and emotionally fraught issue. It results in the emission of major greenhouses gases, such as

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Climate Change Impacts On Mountains: Time For Action Now

Dec 6th, 2012 | By
mountain_day_doha-2




MP Press Release: Mainstreaming Rio+20 outcomes in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) processes for prosperous, resilient, and sustainable mountain ecosystems and communities” was held in Doha, Qatar, on 3 December 2012, on the sidelines of the 2012 UN Climate Change Conference.   The strong negative impact of climate change on the life

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Climate Forecasts Boosted West African Floods Response

Dec 5th, 2012 | By
The early warning, early action strategy improved flood responses in West Africa-Flickr/Stig Nygaard




Scidev.net: Climate forecasting in an early-warning strategy led to fewer deaths and more efficient disaster management for floods that took place in West Africa in 2008, a study reports. It was the first time seasonal climate data in an ‘early warning, early action’ (EWEA) system had been deployed for flood response in the region, enabling

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Citizen Scientists Help Map Mangroves From Qatar To Brazil

Dec 4th, 2012 | By
citizen scientists cop18




CoP 18: Smartphone technology brings public and researchers together to study nature. It came from a simple idea to help exchange students communicate effectively with each other. When a group of students on a Qatar Foundation International (QFI) exchange programme to Doha had difficulty communicating with their Qatari counterparts, the programme organisers came up with

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A Conversation With: India’s Chief Climate Change Negotiator

Dec 4th, 2012 | By
India’s chief climate change negotiator, Meera Mehrishi. Photo: Betwa Sharma




The NewYork Times: With one week left for the U.N. climate change talks to conclude, developed and developing countries remain at odds on how to solve the crisis being linked to the recent spate of extreme weather events that have claimed lives and destroyed property worth billions of dollar. India has agreed to a take

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Global Water Crisis: Seen From The First Himalayan Glacial Trickle

Dec 3rd, 2012 | By
111910_0543_Pollutionin1.png




Global water crisis: Reporter William Wheeler talks about water stress from the effects of climate change high in the Himalayas where India and Pakistan’s great rivers start to Haiti’s fresh-water pollution. In the Nepalese Himalayas in 2009, I trekked into the Langtang Valley, just short of the Tibetan border, and to a village of empty

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Mountain Day At Doha

Nov 30th, 2012 | By
mountain day-2




ICIMOD: Mountain Day is organized each year during the Conference of the Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to: Bring attention to the vulnerability of mountain ecosystems and mountain people to climate change impacts and discuss the options for adaptation and resilience building; Promote better understanding of the role

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Pakistan Ranks Third In Climate-Risk Index 2013

Nov 29th, 2012 | By
Pakistan indigenous people




  Pakistan Today: Despite severe flooding in 2011, Pakistan managed to drop itself from first last year, to third position this year in the league table for countries that were worst hit by extreme weather events in 2011, according to a ‘climate risk index 2013’ published here on Tuesday. In 2011, the ranking of the

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Space Age Science Used To Help Sustain Earth

Nov 29th, 2012 | By
Cop18spacecommunication




CoP18: Technology used to search for water on Mars is being used to search for reserves. Space technology that was used to search for water on Mars is now being used closer to home. The Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research and NASA have used equipment designed to search for signs of life on Mars to

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Climate Change Talks: What Are The Goals In Qatar

Nov 27th, 2012 | By
Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) at the opening session of the climate change conference in Doha, Qatar, Monday, Nov. 26, 2012. (AP Photo/Osama Faisal)




The Christian Science Monitor: UN talks for a new pact to curb greenhouse emissions and slow climate change are underway in Qatar. Negotiators hope to extend the Kyoto Protocol. The concentration of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide has jumped 20 percent since 2000, according to a U.N. report released last week. United Nations talks

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The Planet’s Thermostat Moves To Doha

Nov 27th, 2012 | By
A family walks along the beach in the North Atlantic Autonomous Region, in northeastern Nicaragua. Credit: Germán Miranda/IPS




IPS: Qatar, a major oil-producing country, is hosting the latest round of UN climate talks, where the world’s countries will need to negotiate measurable targets to keep global warming under control. The upcoming United Nations climate talks may have a renewed sense of urgency with a new World Bank report warning that the planet is

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Strengthening Disaster Risk Reduction In CCA At COP18

Nov 26th, 2012 | By
UNISDR-drr photo




UNISDR: This paper provides key messages on climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction with the intent of strengthening disaster risk reduction in key climate change adaptation agendas at the UNFCCC COP18. Previous COPs have adopted a number of decisions linking disaster risk reduction to climate change adaptation. These decisions include the Adaptation Committee and

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Polluted Ganges A Major Source Of Cancer In India

Nov 26th, 2012 | By
Ganga basin-IIT D




Ganga is considered the sacred river and the deep bond that the people of India share with this spiritual entity is immense. Now this bond is making many pay a high price, after being diagnosed with cancer. The river was placed on the list of five most polluted rivers back in 2007. Adding to the

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Data Gaps Hamper Disaster Risk Reduction

Nov 23rd, 2012 | By
Okhimath-disaster 2012




Scidev.net: Reducing risks and losses from natural disasters calls for collaboration between social and natural scientists, who in turn must work with policy makers, communities and development groups, an international expert has said. For example, Bangladesh scientists had forecast the current devastating floods but local communities did not heed their warnings. In the 2010 Pakistan

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India’s Nexus Between Resources, Climate Change – And Stability

Nov 22nd, 2012 | By
Hand pump Reuters




NATO Review Magazine: Few would predict that growing populations, decreasing resources and climate change will have an effect on security. But what could they be? And how will they affect heavily-populated areas of the world? Michael Kugelman looks at the potential changes for South Asia in general, and India in particular. Few regions are more

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Bias in Ecology and Climate Studies? How Leaves Shrink as They Dry out Is Often Overlooked

Nov 21st, 2012 | By
How much a leaf shrinks once it dries out varies with the species. The leaves of the Colorado ragwort lose nearly half their size. (Credit: Ben Blonder)




ScienceDaily: Leaves shrink when they dry out. What sounds straightforward has far-reaching consequences for scientists studying how ecosystems work or reconstructing past climates, a team of 40 middle school students led by a UA graduate student has discovered. Students at Miles Exploratory Learning Center place a leaf on a precision scale encased in a transparent

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Biodiversity Protection Needs Community Input

Nov 21st, 2012 | By
REDD+ has been criticised for leading to commercial monocultures of fast-growing alien trees .Flickr/ kalimantan




Scidev.net: A pledge to increase support for biodiversity targets in developing countries is welcome, but care for indigenous people is vital too. This month’s (October 2012) meeting of the 11th Conference of the Parties (COP 11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), held in Hyderabad in India, came as a reality check on the

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Maplecroft’s Climate Change Vulnerability Index 2013: Cities Face Risks

Nov 20th, 2012 | By
131380-Maplecroft_CCVI_Sub-National_Map




Reliefweb: Cities of Dhaka, Manila, Bangkok, Yangon and Jakarta face highest climate change risks – Maplecroft New York at ‘medium risk’ despite exposure to natural hazards Multinational companies operating in the Asian growth economies will be exposed to spiralling environmental risks over the coming decades, according to Maplecroft’s 5th annual Climate Change and Environmental Risk

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Watching Global Warming From The Roof Of The World

Nov 20th, 2012 | By
Crossing the plateau - (copyright Marc Foggin/ Plateau Perspectives)




Worldcrunch: Sometimes described as the engine of the global climate system because of its role in climate and water systems, the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in western China, with its fragile and sensitive ecosystem, is considered a “canary-in-the-mine” for global climate change. The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, also called the Tibetan Plateau, covers about 25% of China’s surface area

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Nepal Prepares For CoP 18: A Consultation Workshop

Nov 19th, 2012 | By
consultation workshop-nepal




CNN: Government of Nepal, Ministry of Environment, Science and Technology in collaboration with Climate Change Network Nepal/Clean Energy Nepal organized a consultation workshop on “Nepal’s Preparation for COP 18” at Lalitpur on November 12, 2012. The aim of the workshop was to share the issues to be considered in COP 18 to the concerned stakeholders

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No Success For REDD+ Without Understanding Possible Impacts

Nov 19th, 2012 | By
Redd plus countries




PHYS.org: No success for REDD+ without understanding possible impacts on forest biodiversity and people. The world’s rapidly dwindling forests should be valued as more than just “carbon warehouses” to mitigate climate change, according to a new report released today from the International Union of Forest Research Organizations(IUFRO), the world’s largest network of forest scientists. In

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Himalayan Glaciers Will Shrink Despite Steady Climate

Nov 19th, 2012 | By
Glaciers in himalaya




Zee News: Some glaciers of the Himalayas will continue shrinking for many years to come, even if temperatures hold steady, a Brigham Young University geology professor has predicted. Professor Summer Rupper made her estimation after she conducted a research on Bhutan, a region in the bull’s-eye of the monsoonal Himalayas. Rupper’s most conservative findings indicate

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Coal Blooded-Putting Profits Before People

Nov 19th, 2012 | By
coal mines




Shankar Sharma: A survey report of a large number of coal power plants in US (as forwarded below) has a huge relevance to Indian power sector. A 2000 report on power plant pollution in US is reported to have found that all power plants in the U.S. (both coal and other fuel sources) are responsible

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Roots of Deadly 2010 India Flood Identified; Findings Could Improve Warnings

Nov 16th, 2012 | By
Leh, an Indian town in a high desert valley in the Himalaya mountains, as it appeared just a few days before the flood. Credit: Jennifer Spatz, Global Family Travels




Phys.org: On the night of Aug. 5, 2010, as residents slept, water began rushing through Leh, an Indian town in a high desert valley in the Himalayas. Average total rainfall in the area for August is about a half-inch. During this 24-hour period more than 8 inches fell, causing severe damage and leaving 193 dead,

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UMPI Professor Performs Research In Himalayas On Climate Change

Nov 16th, 2012 | By
OSING AT THE YEETSIN HOTEL - After their expedition, research team members returned to Bhutan’s capitol, Thimphu, and experienced the culture, including wearing these gho, traditional dress for men. Standing with UMPI faculty member David Putnam (center) are, from left, his son Aaron Putnam and Dr. Edward Cook, both of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University. – Contributed image




Fiddlehead Focus: This fall, a University of Maine at Presque Isle faculty member was able to join his son on the trip of a lifetime: an international research expedition to Bhutan organized by Columbia University that could have far-reaching impacts on issues ranging from climate change to the future of water resources in southern Asia.

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Project Affected Population And Livelihood Issues In Indian Himalayan Region

Nov 13th, 2012 | By
The water at THDP




Taylor Wilmot: In the twentieth century big dams and other development projects were often associated with progress and prosperous economic development for many countries, including India (Khagram, 2005). Dam development projects entice governments with the promise of hydroelectricity, irrigation, and drinking water for their growing populations. They represent an abundant resource to developing countries (Khagram,

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How to Improve Coastal Cities Climate Resilience: A Q&A with Cynthia Rosenzweig

Nov 13th, 2012 | By
Alcatraz.prison.sea1




Scientific American: Cities are on the frontlines of climate change impacts. Some, such as New York City, have already begun to adapt—but not enough Climate scientist Cynthia Rosenzweig has been studying the impacts of global warming on New York City since the 1990s, and was part of a group that analyzed the unique risks faced

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Climate Change: Food Crisis And Future Hunger Wars

Nov 13th, 2012 | By
food and climate




Countercurrent: Climate Change and its Effects on Food Production In a recent post I wrote about Overpopulation: Food Crisis and future Hunger Wars. The article focused on the impact of the population explosion on food supplies – will there be enough food for a population of 9 billion in 2050? There are many interrelated and

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Climate Change Seen As Threat To Global Water Supply

Nov 13th, 2012 | By
California is the world’s sixth largest agricultural exporter and is dependent on snowpack for those crops. (California Dept. of Water Resources)




The Truth Pursuit: Global warming over the next century could significantly reduce the amount of winter snowpack in mountainous areas in the northern hemisphere, according to a new study published in Nature Climate Change. Seasonal snowpack melt is an essential source of fresh water, and its loss could threaten drinking water supplies, agricultural irrigation and wildlife

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Melting In The Andes: Goodbye Glaciers

Nov 8th, 2012 | By
01_GlacierHDR-Andes




Nature: Researchers are racing to determine how shrinking glaciers in the Andes will affect the water supply of millions of people. From the shade of an adobe house overlooking Peru’s Santa River, Jimmy Melgarejo squints at the dual peaks of Mount Huascarán looming against a cloudless sky. “The snow keeps getting farther away,” says Melgarejo,

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EU Grants 1.2m Euros For Climate Change Study: Pakistan

Nov 7th, 2012 | By
Swat valley pakistan




Tribune: The European Union has provided a grant of 1.2 million euros for conducting a climate change impact assessment study in Swat basin in the wake of Munda Dam multi-purpose project in Mohmand Agency of the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (Fata). For the study, a joint venture comprising two renowned firms – AHT of Germany

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Mountain Meadows Dwindling in U.S. Due to Climate Change, Study

Nov 6th, 2012 | By
Debris flow. Conditions for a dense tree invasion are even more favorable near a 1934 debris flow off Mount Jefferson, compared to the islands of old trees dispersed in the meadow. (Credit: Photo by Harold Zald, courtesy of Oregon State University)




Science Daily: Some high mountain meadows in the Pacific Northwest are declining rapidly due to climate change, a study suggests, as reduced snowpacks, longer growing seasons and other factors allow trees to invade these unique ecosystems that once were carpeted with grasses, shrubs and wildflowers. The process appears to have been going on for decades,

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Biodiversity Protection Needs Community Input

Nov 5th, 2012 | By
REDD+




Scidevnet: A pledge to increase support for biodiversity targets in developing countries is welcome, but care for indigenous people is vital too. This month’s meeting of the 11th Conference of the Parties (COP 11) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), held in Hyderabad in India, came as a reality check on the capacity of

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Food Switch Could Offset Climate Threat To Staples – Study

Nov 1st, 2012 | By
Myrna Bicera, who owns a two-hectare rice farm, walks in a drought-hit paddy field in Quirino province, north of Manila in the Philippines, March 2010. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo




Alertnet: Climate change could significantly depress yields of maize, wheat and rice, constrain supplies of animal protein, and force a rethink of diets and the crops farmers grow, researchers said on Wednesday. Yields of the world’s three biggest crops in terms of calories provided will decrease in many poorer countries as temperatures rise and rainfall

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Bhutan’s Agriculture Industry Goes 100% Organic

Nov 1st, 2012 | By
Bhutan photo




World Crunch: The future of Bhutan‘s agriculture industry will be organic. The country, which mainly grows oranges, apples, rice and potatoes, had decided to become 100% organic in the next 10 years. Situated in the craggy foothills of the Himalayas, only 3% of the kingdom’s territory is actually farmland. However, 80% of the population of

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Was Hurricane Sandy supersized By Climate Change?

Oct 31st, 2012 | By
Yellow cabs line a flooded street in Queens, New York in hurricane Sandy's wake. Photograph: KeystoneUSA-ZUMA / Rex Features




  Guardian: Hurricane Sandy cannot be attributed to climate change, but warming does mean there is more moisture in the atmosphere. As I write this, Hurricane Sandy’s minimum central pressure has dropped to a stunning 940 millibars, meaning that air is rising in this storm in a way similar to a Category 4 hurricane. Sandy

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Climate Change Adding Sting To Mosquito Bite, Says WHO Report

Oct 31st, 2012 | By
Mosquito




Times of India: The warning is ominous — climate change and global warming will make vector-borne diseases like dengue and malaria– already causing havoc in the country more lethal. A landmark report on climate change and health, published by the World Health Organization on Monday, said that in the last 100 years, the world has

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Social Forestry, Again

Oct 31st, 2012 | By
social-and-farm-forestry04




RECOFTC: Celeste Lacuna-Richman, Environmental Policy Lecturer at the University of Eastern Finland (UEF), discusses the importance of designing forestry programs that take into account the realities faced by communities on-the-ground. In Finland, the forestry sector is so well-integrated into the larger society that the concept of “social forestry” seems to be superfluous.  Thus, for more

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Water Wealth and Energy in the Indian Himalayas

Oct 31st, 2012 | By
Silk rout




Kelly D. Alley: The Himalayas is a place of majesty where glaciers hug the world’s tallest mountains, snow melt and precipitation combine to form the water of many vibrant river systems, and millennia of cultural and linguistic diversity guide human life ways. The Silk Roads of the past navigated this complex region and laid pathways

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Growing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Due to Meat Production

Oct 31st, 2012 | By
Oct-12-photo-3




UNEP: Both intensive (industrial) and non-intensive (traditional) forms of meat production result in the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs). As meat supply and consumption increase around the world, more sustainable food systems must be encouraged. Why is this issue important? For many thousands of years, mankind has lived in close proximity with numerous animal species,

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Teaching Climate Change, Recycling And Natural Resources: Ideas And Activities

Oct 30th, 2012 | By
Roadside recycling




Guardian: Emma Drury delves into the Guardian Teacher Network resource bank goody bag to deliver some eco lesson treats. Coming back after the half-term break attentions will soon start to focus on the inevitable excesses of Christmas – parties, presents and food. So it’s an ideal time to look at how, as individuals, schools and

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Extreme Weather Hits the Poor First – And Hardest

Oct 30th, 2012 | By
IPS Photo Poor hit




IPS News: The old adage ‘nature is the great equaliser’ no longer holds true in countries like Sri Lanka, where the poor bear the brunt of extreme weather events. Gamhevage Dayananda, a farmer from the remote village of Pansalgolla in Sri Lanka’s north-central Polonnaruwa district, can attest to this reality, as he and his fellow

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Bangladesh Resistant Rice May Not Fill Food Gap – Experts

Oct 30th, 2012 | By
paddy bangladesh




Alertnet: Bangladesh is about to release five new drought- and salt-tolerant rice varieties to help farmers cope with rising salinity and more frequent droughts – but some scientists and researchers say the yields are little better than those of current types and will not be sufficient to meet rising demand in the face of climate

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Doubling Hydropower Output Could Cut CO2 Emissions

Oct 30th, 2012 | By
Hydropower China




China.org.cn: Doubling hydroelectricity production by 2050 could prevent annual emissions of up to 3 billion tons of CO2 from fossil-fuel plants, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said in a report released here on Monday. The report entitled “Technology Roadmap: Hydropower,” which is jointly published by the IEA and Brazil’s Mines Ministry, outlined detailed actions “needed

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Poverty Food Security And Climate Change In Nepal

Oct 30th, 2012 | By
Nepal women




One World South Asia: The rate of poverty in Nepal fell from 31% in 2003 to 25% in 2010. The reduction would have been greater but for the decision to upgrade the standard basket of food that is valued as the core component of the national poverty line. The measure of inequality also improved, the

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The Politics Of ‘Climate Silence’

Oct 29th, 2012 | By
daisunfccc




Huffingtonpost: As has been noted relentlessly this week, Monday evening’s third and final presidential debate marked the first time since the 1980s that American presidential or vice presidential contenders were neither asked about, nor inclined to offer up on their own, opinions on climate change and what ought to be done about it. For environmentalists

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New Business Model Offers Fresh Approach for Valuing Nature

Oct 29th, 2012 | By
Forest and Black Pines in Crna Poda Natural Reserve in Tara Canyon




Conservation International: Over the past few years, CI [Conservation International] has had the good fortune to work with — and ultimately bring onto our board — natural capital thought leader Pavan Sukhdev. Our relationship with Pavan initially centered around his efforts as lead author on “The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB)” study, but has

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Community Adaption Practices In Uttarakhand Himalayas Of India: Case Study

Oct 26th, 2012 | By
001




Cassie Denbow: The Hindu-Kush Himalayas (HKH) is one of the most diverse ecological regions in the world. Stretching from Afghanistan to Myanmar, the mountainous region encompasses the world’s highest peaks, 30% of the world’s glaciers[1], and provides between 1.3-1.8 billion[2] people with water and other natural resources. The Western Indian Himalayas are the segment of

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Will Climate Change Lead To More Droughts?

Oct 26th, 2012 | By
FAQ on drought :  Historic Drought Cripples Farms And Ranches In American West




Guardian: Although climate change is expected to lead to slightly more rainfall at the global level, the timing and distribution of that rain is likely to change, increasing the chance of drought in some regions. The details are very difficult to predict, however. This is partly because regional climate impacts are strongly dependent on large-scale

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Tracking Glaciers In Hindu Kush Himalayan Region

Oct 25th, 2012 | By
himalaya55dz




University of Dayton: NASA has awarded nearly $1 million to a team of researchers that includes University of Dayton geology professor Umesh Haritashya to study potential hazards caused by changes to glaciers in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya region. The University of Dayton will receive $358,542 of the grant, with the balance going to the University of

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India Expands Its Biodiversity Databases

Oct 23rd, 2012 | By
Elephants_in_Mudumulai_biodiversity_reserve




Scidev.net: India is expanding its biodiversity databases and linking them in a network so that policymakers for programmes that address biodiversity, climate changeand socio-economic concerns have ready access to information. An Indian Bioresources Information Network (IBIN) was launched this month (11 October) by M. S. Swaminathan, eminent crop scientist and founder of the M.S. Swaminathan

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India Plays Crucial Role Protecting Sacred Himalayan Sites

Oct 22nd, 2012 | By
The Honourable Prime Minister of Bhutan (President of the Bhutan Climate Summit Secretariat) with the head of delegations




WWF: The birthplace of Lord Buddha in Nepal, a mountain revered as the centre of the universe in Tibet, long-standing monasteries in Bhutan, and majestic alpine lakes in India are among the many sacred natural sites in the Eastern Himalayas that have been preserved by traditional belief systems that place a high value on nature,

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